Polish Words-Koniec

A weekly service where I teach you some Polish.

koniec–[konyech];noun, end, finish

Example Sentence: To jest koniec. (This is the end.)

Notes: Well my friends, I did it. I had my final Polish lesson last night. I earned my certificate which proclaims me to be at level A2, and I’m guessing the highest you can get is Z100 because that’s about how far I am from being fluent. My teacher gave me a gift; it was a flashdrive with a song that reminded her of her mother who passed. It is in both English and Polish. Why would she give me a sad song? She had read my blog about my brother passing and how I grieve, and she thought I would like to hear it. How sweet is that? She really was a great teacher and is a kind person. I’m glad I was here to meet her. For my final lesson, we listened to “Silent Night” in Polish and translated it. It was so beautiful. I couldn’t find the version we listened to, but I found one that is nice which I hope you enjoy.

Wesołych Świąt. (Merry Christmas.)

 

Polish Word Wednesday 7

A weekly service where I teach you some Polish.*

zimno–[zheemnoh];adverb, cold

Example Sentence: Mi zimno. Zimno mi. (I’m cold. Get me out of here.)

Notes: A related word is zima. In Polish zima means winter; in American English it means, “Hey high school girls, wanna party?”

And now, for your viewing pleasure, a video:

What words or phrases are you dying to see me explain? Let me know, and you just may see your word in my words next week.

*Be advised that I know less Polish than just about everyone. Please do not use my lessons to actually speak Polish.

Polish Word Wednesday 6

A weekly service where I teach you some Polish.*

dziękuję–[jenkooyeh]; thank you

Example Sentence: I’ve heard that the accent you have when you say ‘dziękuję’ gives away your nationality. Mine screams Texas y’all.

Notes: Though this was a fine word to learn when we first moved here, the great Ice Cream Stand blow-up of spring 2011 showed that I needed to learn some more useful terms. For example, it would have been helpful to know how to say chocolate ice cream and make mine with nuts on top.

And now, for your viewing pleasure, a video:

What words or phrases are you dying to see me explain? Let me know, and you just may see your word in my words next week.

*Be advised that I know less Polish than just about everyone. Please do not use my lessons to actually speak Polish.

Polish Word WednesMonday 5

A weekly service where I teach you some Polish.*

chleb–[hlehbnoun; bread, one of the four food groups along with cheese, ketchup, and salt

Example Sentence: Stephanie was so desperate for bread she practiced saying chelb until she was blue in the face.

Notes: When we were preparing to move to Poland, I read a guide book to get a little background. I may have skimmed some sections, and I sometimes only remember part of a fact but share it anyway. And that’s how I talked my parents into buying this cheese which I told them was traditional bread from the mountain region of Poland. It was not good. It seems you are supposed to fry it and serve it with a sauce.

Tell me that brown stuff doesn’t look like bread.

And now, for your viewing pleasure, a video:

What words or phrases are you dying to see me explain? Let me know, and you just may see your word in my words next week.

*Be advised that I know less Polish than just about everyone. Please do not use my lessons to actually speak Polish.

Polish Word Wednesday 4

A weekly service where I teach you some Polish.*

książka–[kshonshkahnoun; book

Example Sentence: Stephanie was so silly; she hoped she would know enough Polish at the end of two years to read a książka, a book in Polish. She probably can if it’s a children’s book about counting and goes no higher than 19.

Notes: I cannot stop looking at bookstores here even though not much is in English. I occasionally find a magazine I am interested in, like Redbook or Ladies’ Home Journal. I like this British magazine called Red, and could buy British Vogue if I cared about dressing up for my days of sitting in the apartment. There is a large bookstore chain that usually has one small section of books in English. For some reason, they love Harlan Coben and have all the Sookie Stackhouse novels available. They also seem down with translating Terry Pratchett, which seems an odd choice.

And now, for your viewing pleasure, a video:

What words or phrases are you dying to see me explain? Let me know, and you just may see your word in my words next week.

*Be advised that I know less Polish than just about everyone. Please do not use my lessons to actually speak Polish.

Polish Word Wednesday 3

A weekly service where I teach you some Polish.*

Wszystkich ŚwiętychPronunciation? Type it in Google Translate and take a listen. Then completely understand why my Polish teacher occasionally giggles at my pronunciation; All Saints’ Day, November 1st

Example Sentence: Since Thursday is Wszystkich Świętych, Stephanie made sure to buy milk Wednesday.

Notes: This holiday is a time to remember the deceased. Families decorate the graves of family members with flowers and candles. Graves long forgotten or abandoned are also cleaned and adorned with flowers. All Saints’ Day is a national holiday in Poland, and, as such, is a day off work. This also means stores and restaurants are closed. I learned about national holidays the hard way when I had to drive to five gas stations to scrounge milk one day.

The grocery store was busy today with people stocking up on flowers and candles.

These are some of the candles people use for All Saints’ Day. They come in many sizes and colors. People buy them by the case.

What words or phrases are you dying to see me explain? Let me know, and you just may see your word in my words next week.

*Be advised that I know less Polish than just about everyone. Please do not use my lessons to actually speak Polish.

Polish Word Wednesday 2

A weekly service where I teach you some Polish.*

brat–[brahtnoun; male sibling, brother

Example Sentence: Moj brat na imie Robert. (My brother is named Robert.)

Notes: Sisters of the world, fell free to call your brother a ‘brat’ then claim you were speaking Polish when he tattles to your mom that you called him mean name. (When I was very little, I had a t-shirt with shiny letters spelling ‘brat’. There is a lovely photo of me wearing it and posing like a, well, a brat. Family legend has it that I told strangers that only my brothers could call me that.) Also, do not call Polish sausage ‘brat’ because that’s German. Here it is called kielbasa, and my kids adore it.

Raise a toast to your brat!

What words or phrases are you dying to see me explain? Let me know, and you just may see your word in my words next week.

*Be advised that I know less Polish than just about everyone. Please do not use my lessons to actually speak Polish.